Christian Relief Services will hold our Second Annual Golf Classic. All proceeds from this charity tournament benefit Safe Places – long-term transitional housing serving women and children fleeing domestic violence.

“Because no one should have to choose between homelessness and abuse”

Date and Time: Friday, May 19, 2017 – Lunch at NOON. Shotgun start at 2pm

Place:  The Golf Club at Lansdowne Resort, 44050 Woodbridge Parkway, Leesburg, VA 20176

Format: Scramble

Deadline: All registrations and payments must be received by May 19, 2017Register here or use the downloadable form below.

Christian Relief Services will hold our Second Annual Golf Classic. All proceeds from this charity tournament benefit Safe Places – long-term transitional housing serving women and children fleeing domestic violence.

All entrance fees include green fees, cart, range balls, contests, lunch, dinner, and prizes.

Contests and Prizes ♦ Silent Auction ♦ Goody Bags ♦ 50/50 Raffle

Contact Amanda Moyer for additional information at amandam@christianrelief.org or (703) 317-9086 ext. 103

Submit Forms Online:

Downloadable Forms:

Christian Relief Services is pleased to announce that the Wells Fargo Foundation has awarded it a grant of $2,500 in support of its Safe Places transitional housing program for victims of domestic violence and their children operating in Fairfax County, Virginia.

Since 1996, Safe Places has been vital to survivors of domestic violence offering safe, affordable housing to women and their children. The mission of Safe Places is to break the cycle of domestic violence so families can live their lives free of abuse.

Simply stated – Safe Places saves lives.

In Fairfax County, domestic violence is the leading cause of homicide. Victims also represent 41 percent of the homeless population in the county.

When a woman leaves an abusive relationship, she is at the highest risk of danger and often has no place to go, faces discrimination, and often is temporarily unable to work.

With a lack of resources, someone to turn to, hard to find affordable housing and long wait lists, too many victims of domestic violence and their children are forced to make the terrible choice between suffering continued abuse at home or becoming homeless.

But, when a victim of domestic violence enters the Safe Places program she is safe and cared for. First, she is assigned a case manager who works with her and her children to develop her individual service plan and supports her through incremental steps to achieve her goals. This work takes place during home visits and out in the community where the case manager is her advocate when seeking community resources and/or support.

Once in the Safe Places program, in addition to the safe housing that she is able to afford based on her wages, and the case management support which this important Wells Fargo Foundation grant will help to pay for, she is the recipient of her own individualized financial counseling through Christian Relief Services’ Safe Places Economic Empowerment Program for up to 24 months so that when this transitional period is over she will be able to support herself and her children on her own.

“On behalf of the clients we serve I want to express our sincere gratitude to the Wells Fargo Foundation for its generosity to the Safe Places program,” said Safe Places Program Director, Amanda Moyer.

 

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In 2015, Fairfax County, Virginia police received an average of more than eight domestic violence calls for service each day. In many cases, the victim ultimately refuses to press charges or leave their abuser because they have nowhere to turn.

Because no one should have to choose between homelessness and abuse, Christian Relief Services, based in Fairfax County founded its Safe Places program to provide long-term transitional housing and support services for women and children fleeing domestic violence.

Women such as Antonia and her four children have a home today because of Safe Places after fleeing to a domestic violence shelter that only allowed them to stay for about a month. Without the Safe Places program, the family could have ended up living together in their car with no money for rent and nowhere else to go for help.

Antonia, an immigrant to the United States with no family in the country, had fallen out of love with her husband, but for the sake of her children, she stayed with him.

That is, until the day he assaulted her. She called police who charged her husband with domestic assault, received a 3-day protective order, and within two days she and her children were living in a shelter. She later sought and received a 15-day protective order and ultimately a two-year protective order.

Although she lost her job while she was living in the shelter, her 19-year-old daughter Catalina is the family breadwinner for the time being. But, with help from her Safe Places case worker, she is looking to find a new job, improve her English language skills and earn her U.S. citizenship in the next two years. Catalina hopes to earn a degree in nursing and start a career.

Antonia’s dream, when she completes the Safe Places program, is to be able to afford her own mobile home, and become a homeowner instead of paying rent all her life.

Today, despite the hardships and challenges, Antonia and Catalina are all smiles and laughter and full of joy.

“We are very happy and grateful for this opportunity and for Safe Places for helping us when we had nobody,” Antonia said. “And helping still.”

“She feels positive about the future,” adds Catalina.

 

Imagine living in house – the place you and your family call home – with a roof that leaks, floors that sag or worse, and in a condition that can only be described as squalid.

Or perhaps the homeowner is elderly, possibly a veteran who has served our country with dignity and honor, but today cannot get in or out of their house without assistance due to a lack of a handicap ramp.

Then ask why?

When there is barely enough money to put food on the table, keep the lights on, and other more immediate, pressing needs such as medication, making repairs to their home – the only thing they own of any value – comes in at a distant last.

Throughout Appalachia, volunteers are giving up a week of their vacation thinking of, and working to help, strangers hundreds of miles from their home, in tandem with grassroots organizations located in hard-hit communities in McDowell County, West Virginia, and Hawkins and Jefferson counties in Tennessee.

These organizations, Big Creek People in Action, Of One Accord, and Appalachian Outreach, respectively, identify those homeowners most needing help with home repairs in the communities, and organize groups of volunteers who come in to do the work.

That’s where Americans Helping Americans® – and you – come in.

Together, we are able to supply the critical funding to purchase shingles for new roofs, lumber for ramps and flooring, drywall for interior repairs, and more. Without this funding, these homes might not get repaired…this month…or even this year.

This month, while those Americans helping Americans are hammering nails, painting walls, and making general repairs, we will tell you of the true, and dire need in Appalachia today.

And we at Americans Helping Americans® hope to be able to continue to do our part – with your assistance – to keep the hammers hammering, the shingles being placed and the paint flowing.

School Supplies
Providing School Supplies in Appalachia. PLEASE HELP

Providing School Supplies in Appalachia through our project Americans Helping Americans in Appalachia. PLEASE HELP

Believe it or not, the school year will begin soon and reservation children face incredible challenges just preparing for the start of school.

Notebooks, pens, pencils, other school supplies and hygiene items are expensive and reservation families must drive long distances to buy them. Few can afford the gas or the school supplies themselves.

In addition to needing school supplies, children from these economically depressed areas are in desperate need of new clothes, shoes, socks, coats…etc.

“I will never forget the shame I felt as a little sixth grade boy having to wear my sister’s blouse to school because we just didn’t have one more piece of boys’ clothing for me. Imagine the embarrassment a little guy would endure wearing a girl’s shirt to the first day of school.”  – Billy Mills, Olympic Gold Medalist and National Spokesperson, Running Strong for American Indian Youth®

 

Providing School Supplies to Children on Indian Reservations. PLEASE HELP TODAY!

Providing School Supplies to Children on Indian Reservations through our project Running Strong for American Indian Youth. PLEASE HELP TODAY!

Please help make the 2014-15 school year a happy time, a time to learn and grow. Please provide children with the “tools” they need to help them with their lessons. 

“Not having basic school supplies, warm clothing, and hygiene items adds to the cycle of desperation and lack of self-esteem these children suffer each day.”

Our goal is to be able to provide over 5,000 school supply kits to elementary school students and over 3,000 school supply kits to Jr. High students. Our dedicated local staff and volunteers will lovingly distribute backpacks filled with school supplies just before school starts. But in order to meet our goal, we need your help!

Remember, these school supply kits and winter coats are visual reminders each day to these special kids that someone cares.

$9.22 provides an Elementary School child a new backpack filled with:

200 Ct. Filler Paper
24 Color Premium Crayons
Pencil Sharpener
12″ Plastic Ruler (English and Metric)
Eraser
1 Glue Stick
1 Pair 5″ Blunt Tip Scissors
1 70 Ct. Spiral Notebook
2 Black Pens
#2 Pencils – 12 pack

$16.29 provides a Jr. High or High School student with a new 18″ backpack is filled with:

300 Ct. Filler Paper
12 Colored Pencils
Pencil Sharpener
12″ Plastic Ruler (English and Metric)
2 Yellow Highlighters
Eraser
#2 Pencils – 12 Pack
3 Ring Pencil Pouch
2 70 Ct. Spiral Notebooks
2 pocket portfolio folders
8 Digit Pocket Size Calculator w/ Flip Cover
Semi-circle 6″ Protractor
2 Yellow Highlighters

Summer Camp Feeds ChildrenWhile many elementary school-aged children can’t wait for the summer months when school is out to be able to play all day, go swimming and perhaps have a nice vacation with their families, for many low-income children on free- and reduced-lunches programs, it can be a time of hunger. That’s why our project Americans Helping Americans® in Applalachia partners with numerous organizations in Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee, and West Virginia with our Summer Food Program.

This summer alone, we are providing a total of 46,000 sandwiches to six of our partner organizations. And no, these aren’t bologna or tuna fish sandwiches served cold, but bacon, egg and cheese, southwest chicken and vegetable, creamy chicken and vegetable and even a sausage pizza sandwich served piping hot from the microwave – likely the only hot meal the child will receive that day.

Working with a vendor which specializes in developing nutritious meals for food banks and non-profits across the country, Christian Relief Services’ project Americans Helping Americans® in Appalachia is able to provide the summer food for the children in the most affordable way possible. For the kids, however, the best thing about the sandwiches is simply that they taste good.

Please help us feed children this summer!
donate-now

 

Camp Appalachia

Appalachian parents often work full-time, low-paying jobs throughout the year leaving children unsupervised in the summer months when school is out. Our summer camps provide the children with a safe environment and healthy meals they may not normally receive at home alone. Our camps often also provide the children with clothing, new shoes, and other assistance if they are in need of it.

Did you know 77% of Appalachian children go without three meals a day? When school is out in Appalachia – the free or reduced school lunches end too.

Our summer camps ensure underprivileged Appalachian children receive a nutritious meal each day at camp.

Children are also provided a safe and healthy environment, rather than being left unsupervised at home while their parents are at work. Read some stories from a summer camp we support…

“One eight-year-old boy from the low income housing apartments had some serious anger and anti-social behaviors. After spending three weeks at camp with caring adults over the summer, and receiving lots of one-on-one attention, he was finally able to trust others and even helped other children with their crafts.”

camp“A 13-year-old boy (from the same housing project) came to camp with thorns in his bag—he knew he wasn’t allowed to bring a knife, but evidently he thought he might need to protect himself, so he brought thorns. All day long he kept the bag with him. After being paired up with a counselor one-on-one, by the end of the last day he had relaxed enough to put the bag down and have fun.”

“Many of the children were very hungry—we fed them breakfast, lunch, and sometimes two snacks. After they figured out that it was okay to ask for seconds, they ate hungrily, sometimes having three helpings.”

“And then there was the pool! The children kept asking, “Will we go to the pool today?” It was such a highlight for them! There, a counselor played catch with a boy who hadn’t opened up at all, and whose parents were both in prison. Some of the older girls enjoyed watching the young ones in the shallow end (with a counselor nearby). On rainy days we constructed a slip ‘n’ slide out of tarps, using baby shampoo and baby oil for extra slickness. What a blast! These children smiled, laughed, and rested secure that there were adults in the world who cared for them and wanted their best—if only for a few weeks.”

Submitted by Cumberland Mountain Outreach in KY

 

food deliveries

In 2012, Christian Relief Services and its project, Americans Helping Americans® worked in partnership with volunteers and community partners to provice the following support to Americans living in poverty: 

Outreach Programs for Youth and Families
food deliveries In 2012, our concentrated efforts, through funding to Americans Helping Americans®, an affiliate of Christian Relief Services, assisted very low-income people with emergency assistance, home repair, school supplies, enrichment camps and services for youth, and life skills training in rural areas of Appalachia and urban programs. 27,000 individuals were assisted in Arizona, Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, and the Districk of Columbia. 

Food and Relief Distribution
food and relief distribution
In 2012, we provided a total of 64,336 pounds of food to Americans in dire need. For the holidays, 6,048 turkeys were provided. In addition to the food, other items distributed included blankets, new coats, as well as small gift items for many families that are unable to provide gifts for their children. We also distributed new shoes, hygiene items, and school supplies and craft items. 

Service-Enriched Housing and Community Resource Centers
service enriched housing
Through our Americans Helping Americans® affiliate that we fund, we provided community-based services to residents at Pine Ridge Apartments (301 units) in Phoenix, Arizona.

64,336 lbs of food distributed
6,048 turkeys for the holidays
2,316 blankets
2,043 new coats
3,087 toys
1,624 pairs of new shoes
1,700 hygiene kits
1,800 school supply kits

Domestic Relief and Self-Help Programs

Domestic Relief and Self-Help ProgramsPoverty in America is a daily reality for millions of people, particularly in Appalachia (a region that stretches from New York all the way to Mississippi). That’s why, since 1985, Christian Relief Services has done all it can to help alleviate poverty across America. Through our affiliate, Americans Helping Americans®, we provide emergency assistance, school supplies, new shoes, new coats, new blankets, hygiene items, monthly and supplemental food, food pantry repair, home repair, or assistance with youth enrichment projects, we are doing all we can to lend a helping hand.